Dementia Friends is coming to Nigeria

DFN-Logo3Every Nigerian town and village has someone living with dementia. Almost every Nigerian knows someone living with dementia although they may not be aware of this fact. People with dementia are often misunderstood, excluded or treated differently and are more likely to become socially isolated. Stereotypes or misinformation can intimidate friends and family.

Dementia Friends Nigeria is a national awareness and public engagement initiative. The aim is to support the people and Government States of Nigeria to create a more aware and informed Nigerian population to dispel myths and reduce stigma about dementia. The program focuses on individuals and workplaces, providing the opportunity for people from all walks of life to sign up as a Dementia Friend.

A Dementia Friend is someone who learns a little bit more about what it’s like to live with dementia and then turns that understanding into simple actions that can help people with dementia live well. Registering to become a Dementia Friend is easy and means joining a growing movement of individuals and workplaces who are increasing awareness and creating positive change worldwide.

Nigeria will be the 3rd country to be given the privilege of running the Dementia Friends initiative by Alzheimer’s Society. Canada and Mauritius have already launched Dementia Friends, and other countries are waiting in line. We hope you can join us for the launch of the Nigerian initiative on the 28th of January 2016.

Notes for editors

  • Dementia Friends Nigeriais modelled after Dementia Friends in the United Kingdom.
  • Dementia Friends is an Alzheimer’s Society initiative.
  • The initiative is being adapted to the Nigerian context.
  • For more information contact Kikelomo Laniyonu Edwards, Rossetti Care Limited, Wahabi Olayiwola Layout, Tose, Moniya, Ibadan, Nigeria, telephone +234 (0)7068 633 627
  • The word dementiadescribes a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. Dementia is caused when the brain is damaged by diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease or a series of strokes. Dementia is progressive, which means the symptoms will gradually get worse.
  • Much of the Dementia Friends Nigeria initiative will be carried out online. Bookmark this page for further details dementianigeria.com/dementiafriends

World Alzheimer’s Day 2015 in Oyo State, Nigeria

World Alzheimer’s Day, Oyo State, 21st September 2015

029Rossetti Care worked with Oyo State and the Nigerian Union of Pensioners to produce a lively forum raising awareness in support of all elderly people living with Dementia in Nigeria.

Twelve out of 33 honourable members of the Oyo State House of Assembly attended demonstrating the growing support for the awareness building campaign. Over 300 attended the event and representatives from the media attended to further spread the word.

Speaking after the event, Kikelomo Edwards from Rossetti Care said

I was very impressed with the level of support for this initiative particularly as we had limited resources for promoting it. My thanks go to the Oyo State House of Assembly and the Nigerian Union of Pensioners who continue to show their care for elderly people living with dementia. My apologies to those who did not get the information in time and who were unable to attend.  Oyo state is certainly becoming Dementia aware, and Dementia Friendly!

Norman MacNamara, the Founder of the Purple Angel Dementia Awareness movement, said

We and the world are so very proud of the work you are doing to raise awareness of dementia and hope it spread`s over the whole of your wonderful country. Oyo is the First State in Africa to receive PURPLE ANGEL STATUS, and the others will be looking towards you wonderful people to take your example and take this forward. Please know that we here at the Purple Angel are next to your side at every step of the way and always here to help you when needed. May you be guided to carry on this wonderful work in the knowledge that what you are doing will help so very many, and for that we will be eternally grateful.

 

World Alzheimers Day in Oyo State

21 September 2015, World Alzheimer’s Day

WAM_Oyo_A3121st September is World Alzheimer’s Day™, an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge dementia stigma. Each year, more and more countries are participating in World Alzheimer’s events and in many areas, dementia awareness is growing.

September is a time for action, a global movement united by its call for change, but it is also a time to reflect on the impact of dementia, a disease that will affect more and more people as the years pass.

For this year’s event, we are working with Oyo State, the Nigerian Union of Pensioners and Purple Angel Global. This is to continue our awareness building campaign in support of all elderly people living with Dementia in Nigeria. The main themes for the event are Basic Brain, and General Health Check; Fostering Community Involvement for people living with dementia in Nigeria; and Preparation of Oyo State as an Age Friendly Community.

oyo2Programme of event on the occasion of the Fourth World Alzheimer’s Day Held at the Western Hall, Oyo State House of Assembly, Secretariat, Ibadan on Monday 21st of September 2015

10.15AM – Arrival of invited guests

10.25AM – Arrival of special guests

10.30AM – Opening Prayers by Prof Ogunsheye

10.35AM – Introductions

10.55AM – Welcome address by the Head of Rossetti Care, Mrs Kikelomo Laniyonu Edwards

11.15AM – Remarks by Hon Mrs Bolanle Agbajeadilogo

11.25AM – Remarks by the Secretary of The Nigerian Union of Pensioners (NUP) Comrade Abatan

11.35AM – Good will message, and sample of basic brain, and general health check by the representative of the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Health

11.50AM – Vote of thanks by the Desk Officer Non-Communicable Disease, Mrs Abioye

12NOON – Health checks continue

RefreshmentsDN3_purple_angel

Download a printable copy of the programme here

September 2015: World Alzheimer’s Month activities in Ibadan

World Alzheimer’s Month in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

September 2015 will mark the fourth global World Alzheimer’s Month™, an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge stigma.

The theme for World Alzheimer’s Month 2015 is Remember Me. We’re encouraging people all around the world to learn to spot the signs of dementia, but also not to forget about loved ones who are living with dementia, or those who may have passed away.

The impact of September’s campaign is growing, but the stigmatisation and misinformation that surrounds dementia remains a global problem.

Every September Alzheimer associations across the world take part in an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge the stigma faced by older people living with dementia.

Nigeria has been participating in this campaign. For the last couple of Septembers you may have seen us marching through Ibadan and its suburbs to raise awareness about dementia and Alzheimer’s.

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This year, we are doing a bit more. We continue our awareness campaign towards the end of August going from village to village within Akinyele Local Government Area. Then we move on to Ona Ara Local Government Area through to Ibadan North at the end of September, then other Local Government Areas until we cover the whole of Oyo State by the end of the year.

Rossetti Care, in collaboration with Dementia Care Society of Nigeria (DCSoN), Dementia Nigeria, Dementia Knowledge Exchange Global (DKEG), and Purple Angel Dementia Awareness Nigeria is working with the theme to inform people of ways to reduce the risk of getting dementia as well as raising awareness about how we could better care for our loved ones living with dementia.

This year’s programme starts with the first Memory Cafe event in Nigeria. This will take place on 25th August 2015 at 10am. The venue is at Rossetti Care, Wahabi Olayiwola Layout, Tose, Moniya, Ibadan. The event will include group discussions, music, dancing, food and drinks.

The next event on this programme is the Global World Alzheimer’s Day. Please join us at 10.30am on Monday, September 21st in front of the Ministry of Health, Secretariat, Ibadan. We will march from there to the end of the Restoration Bridge and back, followed by Lunch and Dance at Rossetti Care.

 

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We do not have to look far to see that Nigeria’s aging population is growing. As we get older and approach retirement it is vital that we start to understand and plan for our care needs as well as the already aged people we live with.  Part of this is to reduce the risk of getting dementia as we age. Research shows that there are five main drivers to reducing the risk of developing dementia. They are good care of your heart, keeping physically active, having a healthy diet, keeping mentally active and being in good company taking part in social activities.

We all know a mischievous Uncle, Auntie or grandparent and we love them. Old people, and especially old people with dementia, can be a challenge but they can also be great fun and they still have the capacity to enjoy themselves heartily.  Come and see this for yourself by joining us on 25th August 2015, and on 21st September 2015 to celebrate our older people, learn more about how best to care for them and get information about how help reduce our risk of developing dementia with brain healthy lifestyles.

Visit our Facebook pages: Dementia Nigeria, Dementia Care Society of Nigeria (DCSoN), Purple Angel Dementia Awareness Nigeria

For details phone 07068633627, email info@rossetticare.com Rossetti Care www.rossetticare.com

Dementia, communication, Isolation – Event this Wednesday

CaptureWednesday 4th March Open Event at Rossetti Care

On Wednesday this week we are exploring topics that where touched upon in our January Open Event. Participants wanted more information on what dementia is and how it differs from other conditions experienced by older people. They also asked shared the frustration encountered in communicating with people with dementia and wanted some information and strategies for better communication.

We have added these subjects to our programmed item “Tackling Isolation – Community Involvement” to explore at the forthcoming open event. The programme topics are:

  • What is Dementia?
  • Communication and Dementia
  • Tackling Isolation – Community Involvement

If you are interested in any of the topics under discussion please attend. Text RESERVATION to 07068633627 to reserve your place.

The event will be held at the Rossetti Care HQ in Tose, near Moniya. For those needing transport the pick-up point is:

  • 4 University Crescent, Bodija at 10am

World Alzheimer Report 2014

World Alzheimer Report 2014 Reveals Persuasive Evidence For Dementia Risk Reduction

London, 17 September 2014

Dementia risk for populations can be modified through tobacco control and better prevention, detection and control of hypertension and diabetes.

The World Alzheimer Report 2014 ‘Dementia and Risk Reduction: An analysis of protective and modifiable factors’, released today, calls for dementia to be integrated into both global and national public health programmes alongside other major non communicable diseases (NCDs).

Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) commissioned a team of researchers, led by Professor Martin Prince from King’s College London, to produce the report. ADI is publishing this report, in conjunction with World Alzheimer’s Day™ (21 September) and as a part of World Alzheimer’s Month, an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge stigma.

The report reveals that control of diabetes and high blood pressure as well as measures to encourage smoking cessation and to reduce cardiovascular risk, have the potential to reduce the risk of dementia even in late-life. The report found that diabetes can increase the risk of dementia by 50%. Obesity and lack of physical activity are important risk factors for diabetes and hypertension, and should, therefore, also be targeted.

While cardiovascular health is improving in many high income countries, many low and middle income countries show a recent pattern of increasing exposure to cardiovascular risk factors, with rising rates of diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Smoking cessation is strongly linked in the report with a reduction in dementia risk. For example, studies of dementia incidence among people aged 65 years and over show that ex-smokers have a similar risk to those who have never smoked, while those who continue to smoke are at much higher risk.

Furthermore, the study revealed that those who have had better educational opportunities have a lower risk of dementia in late-life. Evidence suggests that education has no impact on the brain changes that lead to dementia, but reduces their impact on intellectual functioning.

The evidence in the report suggest that if we enter old age with better developed, healthier brains we are likely to live longer, happier and more independent lives, with a much reduced chance of developing dementia. Brain health promotion is important across the life span, but particularly in mid-life, as changes in the brain can begin decades before symptoms appear.

The study also urges NCD programs to be more inclusive of older people, with the message that it’s never too late to make a change, as the future course of the global dementia epidemic is likely to depend crucially upon the success or failure of efforts to improve global public health, across the population. Combining efforts to tackle the increasing global burden of NCDs will be strategically important, efficient and cost effective. Leading a healthier lifestyle is a positive step towards preventing a range of long-term diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

However, survey data released by Bupa* has shown that many people are unclear about the causes and actions they can take to potentially reduce their risk of dementia. Just over a sixth (17%) of people realised that social interaction with friends and family could impact on the risk. Only a quarter (25%) identified being overweight as a possible factor, and only one in five (23%) said physical activity could affect the risk of developing dementia and losing their memories. The survey also revealed that over two thirds (68%) of people surveyed around the world are concerned about getting dementia in later life.

Professor Martin Prince, from King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience and author of the report, commented: “There is already evidence from several studies that the incidence of dementia may be falling in high income countries, linked to improvements in education and cardiovascular health. We need to do all we can to accentuate these trends. With a global cost of over US$ 600 billion, the stakes could hardly be higher.”

Marc Wortmann, Executive Director, Alzheimer’s Disease International said: “From a public health perspective, it is important to note that most of the risk factors for dementia overlap with those for the other major non communicable diseases (NCDs). In high income countries, there is an increased focus on healthier lifestyles, but this is not always the case with lower and middle income countries. By 2050, we estimate that 71% of people living with dementia will live in these regions, so implementing effective public health campaigns may help to reduce the global risk.”

Professor Graham Stokes, Global Director of Dementia Care, Bupa, said: “While age and genetics are part of the disease’s risk factors, not smoking, eating more healthily, getting some exercise, and having a good education, coupled with challenging your brain to ensure it is kept active, can all play a part in minimising your chances of developing dementia. People who already have dementia, or signs of it, can also do these things, which may help to slow the progression of the disease.”

The full report can be found here: www.alz.co.uk/worldreport2014

 

September 2014: World Alzheimer’s Month activity in Ibadan

Every September Alzheimer associations across the world take part in an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge the stigma faced by older people living with dementia. Last September you may have seen us marching through Ibadan to raise awareness about dementia in our country.

Alz_march_banner1This year at Rossetti Care, we are working with the theme to inform people of ways to reduce the risk of getting dementia as well as raising awareness about how we could better care for our loved ones living with dementia.

The programme starts with a Communion Service followed by discussions, singing, music, dancing and good food at our main building in Tose, near Moniya.  Please join us at 3pm on Sunday September 21st at Rossetti Care, Wahabi Olayiwola Layout, Tose, Moniya, Ibadan.

We do not have to look far to see that Nigeria’s aging population is growing. As our baby boomers get older and approach retirement it is vital that we start to understand and plan for their, and our, care needs as well as the already aged people with we live with.  Part of this is to reduce the risk of getting dementia as we age. Research shows that there are five main drivers to reducing the risk of developing dementia. They are good care of your heart, keeping physically active, having a healthy diet, keeping mentally active and being in good company taking part in social activities.

facebook-cover-photo-eng

We all know a mischievous Uncle, Auntie or grandparent and we love them. Old people, and especially old people with dementia, can be a challenge but they can also be great fun and they still have the capacity to enjoy themselves heartily.  Come and see this for yourself by joining us on 21st September 2014 to celebrate our older people, learn more about how best to care for them and get information about how help reduce our risk of developing dementia with brain healthy lifestyles. For details email info@rossetticare.com

Rossetti Care

www.rossetticare.com

10 September 2014

Risperidone – Antipsychotic drug and people with dementia

Respiridone is a drug that is commonly used for patients living with dementia in Nigeria. The drug can have positive effects for people exhibiting persistent aggression who may put themselves or others at risk of harm but it should only be used as a short-term measure due to other risks associated.

Clinical trials have proven a link between the use of Respiridone and stroke in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Respiridone should therefore only be used for a short period, say three weeks, whilst other means are found to manage persistent aggression.

Antipsychotic drugs should never be used  to pacify people who are not psychotic.

Advice for healthcare professionals:

There is a clear increased risk of stroke and a small increased risk of death when antipsychotics (typical or atypical) are used in elderly people with dementia

The balance of risks and benefits associated with risperidone treatment should be carefully assessed for every patient, taking into consideration the known increased mortality rate associated with antipsychotic treatment in the elderly. Prescribers should carefully consider the risk of cerebrovascular events before treating with risperidone  any patient who has a previous history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Consideration should also be given to other risk factors for cerebrovascular disease including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and atrial fibrillation.