Nigerian Elected Full Member of the World Dementia Council

Nigerian serves on the World Dementia Council

Nigerian Chief Kikelomo Laniyonu Edwards has been elected as a Full Member of the World Dementia Council at a meeting in London where the Council was re-formed to include representation from all over the world.

An excited Kiki (as her friends fondly refer to her) promises to use her 3-year tenure to ensure Nigeria and other African countries continue to work towards reducing the stigma, contributing effort into finding a cure, and developing a dementia strategy to care for people with living with Dementia.

group-photo-fms-and-amsThe creation of a World Dementia Council was one of the main commitments made at the G8 Dementia Summit in December 2013.The new Council brings together the broadest range of influential global leaders with expertise and experience in dementia from all sectors, enabling in a bid to challenge and support Governments, industry, NGOs, public sector, academia, the research community and people with dementia worldwide in a concerted effort to address the world’s biggest disease burden.

Care of people with dementia varies hugely across the world, and many experience stigma and social isolation – 40% say that they have been avoided or treated differently. Dementia is sometimes perceived as a normal sign of ageing, mental illness or even by certain cultures as having supernatural elements. People can also be victims of abuse, for example being beaten for being ‘stubborn’, restrained regularly, both physically and by use of antipsychotic drugs, and cast out from their communities.

WDC Chair, Dr. Yves Joanette, said: “The world has to face up to the staggering personal and economic impact of the biggest disease challenge that we face today. I’m delighted to welcome the new international members of our re-formed Council. Together, we have to mount a truly global assault to change the lives for people with dementia and their caregivers, including the most neglected and isolated. We will do so by amplifying the voices of people with dementia, organisations and communities to reach all corners of the world. I look forward to working closely with my colleagues to challenge and support all Governments in addressing this issue.”

The English Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt, said: “I thank the World Dementia Council and Envoy for the remarkable progress they have made so far, setting us well on the way to achieve the aims we first established at the G8 Summit as part of the UK Presidency in 2013. While we are seeing progress in drug development and greater understanding of this disease, there can be no cause for complacency and I look to the World Dementia Council to use their expertise and global reach to drive governments, industry and regulators to further action”.

View the World Dementia Council press release here.

World Alzheimer Report 2014

World Alzheimer Report 2014 Reveals Persuasive Evidence For Dementia Risk Reduction

London, 17 September 2014

Dementia risk for populations can be modified through tobacco control and better prevention, detection and control of hypertension and diabetes.

The World Alzheimer Report 2014 ‘Dementia and Risk Reduction: An analysis of protective and modifiable factors’, released today, calls for dementia to be integrated into both global and national public health programmes alongside other major non communicable diseases (NCDs).

Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) commissioned a team of researchers, led by Professor Martin Prince from King’s College London, to produce the report. ADI is publishing this report, in conjunction with World Alzheimer’s Day™ (21 September) and as a part of World Alzheimer’s Month, an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge stigma.

The report reveals that control of diabetes and high blood pressure as well as measures to encourage smoking cessation and to reduce cardiovascular risk, have the potential to reduce the risk of dementia even in late-life. The report found that diabetes can increase the risk of dementia by 50%. Obesity and lack of physical activity are important risk factors for diabetes and hypertension, and should, therefore, also be targeted.

While cardiovascular health is improving in many high income countries, many low and middle income countries show a recent pattern of increasing exposure to cardiovascular risk factors, with rising rates of diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Smoking cessation is strongly linked in the report with a reduction in dementia risk. For example, studies of dementia incidence among people aged 65 years and over show that ex-smokers have a similar risk to those who have never smoked, while those who continue to smoke are at much higher risk.

Furthermore, the study revealed that those who have had better educational opportunities have a lower risk of dementia in late-life. Evidence suggests that education has no impact on the brain changes that lead to dementia, but reduces their impact on intellectual functioning.

The evidence in the report suggest that if we enter old age with better developed, healthier brains we are likely to live longer, happier and more independent lives, with a much reduced chance of developing dementia. Brain health promotion is important across the life span, but particularly in mid-life, as changes in the brain can begin decades before symptoms appear.

The study also urges NCD programs to be more inclusive of older people, with the message that it’s never too late to make a change, as the future course of the global dementia epidemic is likely to depend crucially upon the success or failure of efforts to improve global public health, across the population. Combining efforts to tackle the increasing global burden of NCDs will be strategically important, efficient and cost effective. Leading a healthier lifestyle is a positive step towards preventing a range of long-term diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

However, survey data released by Bupa* has shown that many people are unclear about the causes and actions they can take to potentially reduce their risk of dementia. Just over a sixth (17%) of people realised that social interaction with friends and family could impact on the risk. Only a quarter (25%) identified being overweight as a possible factor, and only one in five (23%) said physical activity could affect the risk of developing dementia and losing their memories. The survey also revealed that over two thirds (68%) of people surveyed around the world are concerned about getting dementia in later life.

Professor Martin Prince, from King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience and author of the report, commented: “There is already evidence from several studies that the incidence of dementia may be falling in high income countries, linked to improvements in education and cardiovascular health. We need to do all we can to accentuate these trends. With a global cost of over US$ 600 billion, the stakes could hardly be higher.”

Marc Wortmann, Executive Director, Alzheimer’s Disease International said: “From a public health perspective, it is important to note that most of the risk factors for dementia overlap with those for the other major non communicable diseases (NCDs). In high income countries, there is an increased focus on healthier lifestyles, but this is not always the case with lower and middle income countries. By 2050, we estimate that 71% of people living with dementia will live in these regions, so implementing effective public health campaigns may help to reduce the global risk.”

Professor Graham Stokes, Global Director of Dementia Care, Bupa, said: “While age and genetics are part of the disease’s risk factors, not smoking, eating more healthily, getting some exercise, and having a good education, coupled with challenging your brain to ensure it is kept active, can all play a part in minimising your chances of developing dementia. People who already have dementia, or signs of it, can also do these things, which may help to slow the progression of the disease.”

The full report can be found here: www.alz.co.uk/worldreport2014

 

September 2014: World Alzheimer’s Month activity in Ibadan

Every September Alzheimer associations across the world take part in an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge the stigma faced by older people living with dementia. Last September you may have seen us marching through Ibadan to raise awareness about dementia in our country.

Alz_march_banner1This year at Rossetti Care, we are working with the theme to inform people of ways to reduce the risk of getting dementia as well as raising awareness about how we could better care for our loved ones living with dementia.

The programme starts with a Communion Service followed by discussions, singing, music, dancing and good food at our main building in Tose, near Moniya.  Please join us at 3pm on Sunday September 21st at Rossetti Care, Wahabi Olayiwola Layout, Tose, Moniya, Ibadan.

We do not have to look far to see that Nigeria’s aging population is growing. As our baby boomers get older and approach retirement it is vital that we start to understand and plan for their, and our, care needs as well as the already aged people with we live with.  Part of this is to reduce the risk of getting dementia as we age. Research shows that there are five main drivers to reducing the risk of developing dementia. They are good care of your heart, keeping physically active, having a healthy diet, keeping mentally active and being in good company taking part in social activities.

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We all know a mischievous Uncle, Auntie or grandparent and we love them. Old people, and especially old people with dementia, can be a challenge but they can also be great fun and they still have the capacity to enjoy themselves heartily.  Come and see this for yourself by joining us on 21st September 2014 to celebrate our older people, learn more about how best to care for them and get information about how help reduce our risk of developing dementia with brain healthy lifestyles. For details email info@rossetticare.com

Rossetti Care

www.rossetticare.com

10 September 2014

Memory Walk on Thursday, 26 September 2013

Memory Walk on Thursday, 26 September 2013

adi_logoThe increasing diagnosed cases of dementia in Nigeria especially in old age necessitates the creation of awareness and sensitization through intensive campaign among healthcare professionals, formal and informal caregivers, and the general public.

To commemorate the World Alzheimer’s Month 2013 the Alzheimer’s Disease International Oyo State branch have organized a Walk to sensitize the society on the theme “Dementia: a journey of caring”

Join in with the walk to show your support for improving hte well-being for people living with dementia.

The walk starts from The Secretariat, Ministry of Health, Ibadan from 10am on Thursday 26 September 2013.

It will be followed by a lunch hosted by Rossetti Care in Tose, Moniya, Ibadan starting 1pm where you will have the opportunity to discuss issues surrounding dementia and meet professionals working in the field of elderly care.

First G8 dementia summit

First G8 dementia summit to lead international action on tackling the condition

On 11 December 2013 the UK will host the first G8 dementia summi making the fight against dementia global by challenging the G8 to pursue international coordination and an effective response to tackling the condition.

Prime Minister David Cameron acknowledges that dementia is fast becoming one of the greatest pressures on families, carers and health systems around the world.

The UK government is inviting health ministers from G8 countries to discuss how they can coordinate efforts and shape an effective international solution to dementia.

The summit will aim to identify and agree a new international approach to dementia research, to help break down barriers within and between companies, researchers and clinicians and secure a new level of cooperation needed to reach shared goals faster than nations acting alone.

They will draw on the expertise and experience of the OECD, World Health Organisation, industry, national research organisations, key opinion leaders, researchers and physicians.

Read the UKGov Press Release